Denial of Equal Rights

The Japanese faced racism not only from the anti Asian population of British Columbia but also from the government.

Without the right to vote Japanese Canadians were denied the opportunities available to other Canadians. Although they were able to attend university, once graduated they were unable to enter certain professions such as law, education, pharmacy and accounting. They could not work as civil servants. As a result, many turned to self-employment such as fishing, berry or fruit farming in the Fraser valley.

Without the right to vote, Japanese Canadians were considered “second class” citizens or in wartime they were called “enemy aliens” although the majority of people were Canadian born or naturalized Canadians. This denial of rights and without a voice would result in the government’s unjust and harsh treatment of Canadians of Japanese ancestry.

Without the right to vote, Japanese Canadians were considered “second class” citizens or in wartime they were called “enemy aliens” although the majority of people were Canadian born or naturalized Canadians. This denial of rights and without a voice would result in the government’s unjust and harsh treatment of Canadians of Japanese ancestry.

National Association of Japanese Canadians, 180 McPhillips Street, Winnipeg, Manitoba, R3E 2J9

Phone: (204) 943-2910 Fax: (888) 515-3192 Email: national@najc.ca

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